Clooz 2.0 Is Out

I haven’t been paying attention – one of my favorite genealogy applications, Clooz, has left it’s 2.0 beta testing and has now been formally released. The author refers to it as an “electronic filing cabinet ” for genealogy documents and files, and that’s pretty much an apt description.

The 2.0 series had a complete rewrite – in “.Net”, meaning it requires Windows XP unfortunately. Among the significant updates – new templates, census substitutions (for those times you can’t find somebody in the census, this is a good way to document where they were around then), and map tracking/information/storage, and most importantly, GEDCOM importing.

One thing I thought was pretty cool, they’ve added what is basically a building history area to track buildings and land that were important to your ancestors – I’ve mentioned before that people are starting to get into doing research on places and structures.

Apple’s MacBook

Yesterday saw the release of Apple’s MacBook. I have one in my hands (and am in fact typing this from it). I got one of the last half dozen in the store, I believe.

This is sort of a review. I know, you are thinking what does this have to do with genealogy, but this is going to be my genealogy platform of choice for the next few (hopfeully several) years, and I’ll explain why in a moment (if you are interested in Macs, but have some Windows-only applications, read on, you’re in luck).

First, to get the technical stuff out of the way. It’s one of the cheapest (if not cheapest) Intel Core Duo notebooks with a 13.3-inch widescreen that you can find – starts at around $1099. I’m talking Dell, HP, Lenovo, Toshiba, etc. Having an Intel Core Duo is basically the equivalent of having two processors/CPUs in the machine. The screen is wonderful – I’ve always liked widescreen displays because I tend to have a lot of stuff open at the same time, or what I’m doing would benefit from a widescreen in some manner, and on a laptop, having a widescreen is a spacesaver – it’s a little wider than a normal 12-inch display, but it’s not quite as deep. For my eyes, the 13.3 is about as small as I want to go for the time being.

Now then, if you are like me and are holding onto a few Windows applications – especially those related to genealogy – those of you who have been reading RandomGenealogy for a while know I’m cranky when it comes to genealogy applications – namely that I can’t do without applications like GenSmarts and Clooz, then you are in luck.

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Google Notebok Is Here

Yesterday I mentioned Google Notebook – looks like it’s available (if you have a Gmail account).

You can access it at www.google.com/notebook.

Features (From Google’s Site):
* Clip useful information. You can add clippings of text, images and links from web pages to your Google Notebook without ever leaving your browser window.
* Organize your notes. You can create multiple notebooks, divide them into sections, and drag-and-drop your notes to stay organized.
* Get access from anywhere. You can access your Google Notebooks from any computer by using your Google Accounts login.
* Publish your notebook. You can share your Google Notebook with the world by making it public.

ArsTechnica has a good rundown of the capabilities.

Take What You Came With

Jason Probst has an article in The Hutchinson News (Kansas) that could serve as a friendly reminder to always check the items you haul around with you to a library, or in this case, courthouse. It’s an article about the lost and found at the Reno County Courthouse, including some genealogy documents.

Quote:

One time, a woman left a packet of genealogy information on the courthouse’s fourth floor. McKee dug through the file, found a phone number to call and told the woman she held the woman’s family history in her hands.

The woman didn’t even realize she lost the packet of documents.

A lot of us haul a lot of materials around – it’s easy to see that we might leave something behind and not realize it for weeks or months.

Grave Task: Society Documents Martin Dead

Sharon Wernlund has an article in the Palm Beach Post (Florida), Grave task: Society documents Martin dead, about Walt Bruetsch and the Martin County Genealogical Society‘s efforts to document cemeteries in the area and make the information available to other genealogists.

Excerpt from the article:

For two years, the retired Pratt & Whitney engineer has led a cemetery research project for the Martin County Genealogical Society, whose goal is to build a database of the deceased — whether they’re 6 feet under or have cremated remains — to help researchers, both local and worldwide, with their family trees.

Bruetsch is passionate about genealogy. He has traced his European ancestors to the 15th century and walked their footsteps from a Montana homestead to the towns of Ramsen and Frutigen in Switzerland.

“I’ve been researching my own family for years and it’s such a thrill when you find them and make that connection,” said Bruetsch, 69, of Stuart. “You just feel so at peace.”

Since 1996, the genealogical society has surveyed 10 of Martin County’s 14 cemeteries and one of four known columbaria of cremated remains for an online alphabetical listing of some 10,000 dead.

There’s also an evolving index of Martin County obituaries dating to 1913.

Martin County Genealogical Society