Category Archives: Cemetery

Cemetery/Graveyard News

Armstrong County (PA) History Alliance

The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review (PA) has an article, Armstrong history now on Internet, about an alliance of historical/genealogy societies from Armstrong County working together to put the county’s history and genealogy information online. It’s not so much the records (although it sounds like they are working towards that), as it is information about which society holds what records and where you can physically access them. They believe together they will be able to be eligible for more grants and resources.

The alliance is called the Armstrong History Alliance, and is made up of these historical and/or genealogy societies:
Apollo Area
The Kittanning-based Armstrong County Historical Museum and Genealogical Society
Brady’s Bend
Dayton Area
Freeport Area
Leechburg Area
Lower Crooked Creek

Excerpt from the article:

In addition to listing events, the Web site details the different historical buildings each society operates and provides contact information for each, including independent Web sites for those that have them.

Mateer and Kane said they’d eventually like to catalog all of the information and artifacts each society owns and post the catalog on the site.

Mateer said the Armstrong County society also has a database that lists details of most of the tombstones in the county’s 300-plus cemeteries. Those details also could be made available on the Web for people searching their genealogy.

The alliance is applying for a grant from the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission to make the catalog happen, Mateer said.

Kane said many of the individual societies would have a difficult time affording their own Web sites and large-scale promotions, but together they can do more. He also is hopeful the consortium will be more eligible for grants than each society would be on its own.

You can access the website at: www.armstronghistory.org. Hopefully they will succeed in their goals and provide an example for other socities in other areas to follow. Individual societies can sometimes have difficulty in securing the funding to do things like this, and these kinds of alliances might help overcome that obstacle.

Utah Teenage Genealogist Winds up on History Channel

ABC 4 (Utah) has an article/story, Utah teen’s love for genealogy earns him time on History Channel, about a fifteen year old working on his Eagle Scout project that involves genealogy research and cemetery preservation. As a result of this, sometime in the next year on an unnamed show on the History Channel, his project will be feature. Pretty cool, and good exposure for genealogy.

Excerpt from the story:

Fifteen-year-old Brad Jencks of South Jordan was honored with a “Top High School Volunteer for the State of Utah” in the 2006 Prudential Spirit of the Community Awards Program. His work is also slated to be featured on the History Channel within the next year.

“It’s more of a hobby for me. I enjoy doing family history,” Brad Jencks told ABC4 News. “Our family’s really into family history and it’s just a tender part of my heart.”

Jencks’ work began two years ago when he approached the Jordan School District with his 100-hour Eagle Scout service project proposal. The district inherited the Bingham Cemetery when Bingham was disincorporated. Jencks wanted to compile a complete and accurate database for families like his with ancestors buried in the cemetery.

Disturbed Cemetery Descendants Traced

No, the descendants aren’t disturbed, it was the people buried in the cemetery that were disturbed. Don’t you love headlines like that? Jim Wallace of WLAB News (Albany, Valdosta, and Thomasville, Georgia) has news of a cemetery that was accidently disturbed a few years ago (it was harrowed over, and some of the tombstones were nearly destroyed and/or lost. They have managed to track down who was buried there, as well as descendants, and will be contacting the descendants. If you think it might concern you – two of the names mentioned are Roby and Turner, you should check the article out and get in touch with the Dougherty County DA.

Excerpt from the article:

New evidence in the investigation of a rural Dougherty County cemetery that was harrowed over by workers at a neighboring plantation. Historians have taken the pieces of tombstones that were recovered, and identified the people who were buried in that long forgotten cemetery during the 1850’s and 1860’s.

A number of South Georgia families today can be traced to one of those people buried there 160 years ago, and now they will be contacted by the District Attorney’s office about the disturbance of this cemetery.

In the 1850-s and 1860-s there was a cemetery on this plot on the Tallahassee Road in Western Dougherty County. Dougherty County Sheriff’s Investigators say Ecila Plantation workers admit two years ago they harrowed over the long forgotten cemetery by mistake.

Grave Task: Society Documents Martin Dead

Sharon Wernlund has an article in the Palm Beach Post (Florida), Grave task: Society documents Martin dead, about Walt Bruetsch and the Martin County Genealogical Society‘s efforts to document cemeteries in the area and make the information available to other genealogists.

Excerpt from the article:

For two years, the retired Pratt & Whitney engineer has led a cemetery research project for the Martin County Genealogical Society, whose goal is to build a database of the deceased — whether they’re 6 feet under or have cremated remains — to help researchers, both local and worldwide, with their family trees.

Bruetsch is passionate about genealogy. He has traced his European ancestors to the 15th century and walked their footsteps from a Montana homestead to the towns of Ramsen and Frutigen in Switzerland.

“I’ve been researching my own family for years and it’s such a thrill when you find them and make that connection,” said Bruetsch, 69, of Stuart. “You just feel so at peace.”

Since 1996, the genealogical society has surveyed 10 of Martin County’s 14 cemeteries and one of four known columbaria of cremated remains for an online alphabetical listing of some 10,000 dead.

There’s also an evolving index of Martin County obituaries dating to 1913.

Martin County Genealogical Society

Historical Projects Puts Tombstones in Focus

Roger Wolfe, a reporter for 9News (Denver, CO), has written an article, Historical projects puts tombstones in focus, about the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution working on digitally documenting all of the tombstones in Weld County. They then place the images/information online, for other genealogists to access.

Excerpt from the article:

“It’s a matter of respect,” said Chapter Regent Donna Hoffman. “I think we have to know our history. We have to respect the people who went before us. These people are the pioneers of Greeley.”

Having the tombstone pictures available online should be a big help to people researching their family histories. “Genealogy has become a kind of fast and furious growing hobby of people because the Internet has made it so easy to do research,” said D.A.R member Chris Ruth.

You can view their work at PatriotDreams.us/Cemeteries. It’s very impressive – unlike many similar projects, you can actually see a picture of the tombstone itself, and they are organized and fairly easy to find.